2015 Nevada Accident Statistics & Plans

Posted on February 10, 2016 at 7:36am by

If you have ever been in a car accident, you understand the pain and suffering that goes  along with not only the injuries you may have sustained but the negative effect it has on your emotions long term. The worst type of vehicle accidents is by far those that involve a fatality. Read below to learn about Nevada’s recently released statistics on traffic fatalities:

Nevada Accident Statistics – Traffic & Fatalities

Early numbers reveal a 10.3% increase in traffic fatalities, with 321 traffic fatalities being recorded in 2015. Unfortunately, this is an increase of 31 deaths from the previous year. Although these statistics might seem bad, they actually are much better than in years past. las vegas nevada traffic accident statistics and planFor example, in 2006, Nevada reported 431 deaths on their roadways. When compared to that all-time high, you can see that traffic deaths are considerably reduced. That doesn’t mean that even one death is acceptable, though. Nevada Department of Transportation Director Rudy Malfabon recently said, “These (fatality statistics) are so much more than numbers. Every death and serious injury on Nevada roads is a tragedy.” Thankfully, Nevada is making progress in the area of fatalities per 100M Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT). Numbers for 2015 aren’t yet available, but there was a 1.02 drop in 2014, which shows a general decline in that area.

What Nevada is Doing to Prevent Traffic Deaths:

Much of the progress of late can be attributed to the Nevada Strategic Highway Safety Plan, which was launched in 2006 as an answer to the increased traffic fatalities in that year. The program was created by a 15-member Nevada committee. Together, this group came up with strategies for education and public awareness as well as focusing on enforcement and emergency medical service. Committee representatives frequently speak at rotary clubs, business associates and schools as a way to spread the message of roadway safety.

The Committee’s Message:

The Nevada Strategic Highway Safety Plan seems to be working as the numbers are coming down. The committee focused on five key areas as a way to prevent deaths on Nevada’s roadways. These keys are to encourage both sober and alert driving, education on being aware and cautious near pedestrians and at intersections, and finally teaching the importance of seat belts. Wearing a seat belt is the single-most effective way to prevent a traffic death and to reduce injuries sustained in accidents, this according to the Nevada Department of Transportation.

General Tips For Vehicle Safety And Post Accident Suggestions:

Wearing a seat belt is smart, but that won’t prevent someone else from plowing into you while they are driving distracted or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. However, you can make sure you don’t cause a wreck. Always put your phone up when driving, don’t answer a call or text. Also, be sure to never drive under the influence, even if you think you are capable, and make sure to wear your seatbelt. Even if you follow all these tips, you can still get into an accident due to someone else’s negligence as was just discussed. If you find yourself in this situation, be sure to take lots of photos after the accident of the cars and the roadway. Also, be sure to get information from all witnesses who are present. These two aspects could be valuable at a later time when putting together a personal injury case.

How Does This Affect You Once You’ve Been in An Accident?

Unfortunately, these wonderful efforts by committees and the state of Nevada to make the roadways safer and the tips on what to do immediately after an accident don’t do you much good once you’ve been in an accident. However, if your vehicle, motorcycle, pedestrian or bicycle accident was a result of another driver’s negligence, you could still be entitled to compensation. Contact us if you think you might have a case. We will fight for you.

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